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Abortion’s Effects

There are still people trying to minimize or completely ignore the effects of abortion. Obviously, the babies suffer the worst effects. But their mothers, fathers, and other people in the family (present and future) can suffer much, too.

http://catholicexchange.com/2009/04/22/117837/

This is a link to an abstract of a paper on a different angle of the abortion practices in the U.S.

http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=1399553

 

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http://www.lifenews.com/state4357.html – I don’t recall ever hearing of this woman before now, but her truthfulness about the risks of abortion will hopefully be a positive influence on her fans and on anyone else who looks up to celebrities.

Pregnant Hollywood Celeb Kourtney Kardashian Won’t Bow to Abortion Pressure

by Steven Ertelt,   LifeNews.com Editor

August 19, 2009

 .  .  .

“I can’t even tell you how many people just say ‘Oh, get an abortion.’ Like it’s not a big deal,” she said.

But, after talking with her physician about abortion risks and reading up on the Internet about the myriad of medical and mental health problems women have following an abortion, she decided against it.

“I called my best friend crying, and I was like, ‘I don’t know what to do.’ She said, ‘Call your doctor, and at least find out the risks and stuff,'” she explained.

“I looked online, and I was sitting on the bed hysterically crying, reading these stories of people who felt so guilty from having an abortion,” she recalls. “I was reading these things of how many people are traumatized by it afterwards.”

“I was just sitting there crying, thinking, ‘I can’t do that,’ ” she says. “And I felt in my body, this is meant to be. God does things for a reason, and I just felt like it was the right thing that was happening in my life.”

“For me, all the reasons why I wouldn’t keep the baby were so selfish,” she told People. “It wasn’t like I was raped, it’s not like I’m 16. I’m 30 years old, I make my own money, I support myself, I can afford to have a baby. And I’m with someone who I love.”

Despite her own pro-life decision to keep her baby, Kardashian said in the interview she supports legal abortions but is part of the large majority of Americans who thinks some abortion decisions are flippant.

“I do think every woman should have the right to do what they want, but I don’t think it’s talked through enough,” she said.

In the end, Kardashian told People that she made her own decision.

“I really wanted to think it through for myself, and not hear what my sisters were saying, or what Scott was saying. Even though I took it all in, I wanted it to be my decision,” she says.

“My doctor told me there is nothing you will ever regret about having the baby, but he was like, ‘You may regret not having the baby.’ And I was like: That is so true,” she said. “And it just hit me. I got so excited, and when I told Scott he was so excited.”

 

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http://www.lifesitenews.com/ldn/2009/aug/09081807.html

Tuesday August 18, 2009

“Pro-Choice” Abortionist Interviewer Surprised by Her Reaction to Witnessing Abortion

“There was a discomfort I hadn’t expected,” she says, “my emotional reaction to watching abortions.”

By Patrick B. Craine

August 15, 2009 (LifeSiteNews.com) – Newsweek’s Sarah Kliff added her voice to the media campaign softening the image of late-term abortionist LeRoy Carhart on Saturday with her report ‘The Abortion Evangelist’, but says she did not anticipate and has difficulty explaining her emotional reaction to witnessing Carhart actually take the life of an unborn child.

. . .

In a companion piece [see http://www.newsweek.com/id/212117?tid=relatedcl ] to the story, however, Kliff admits that while she is an experienced reporter on abortion-related issues, she was surprised by her emotional reaction to witnessing an abortion for the first time.

Travelling to Nebraska, Kliff says, she was not sure if she even wanted to watch an abortion. “I confess I was hesitant to step into Carhart’s operating room,” she says. Knowing that she would most likely see a first-term abortion, rather than late-term, and knowing all that was involved, “I still felt uneasy,” she says.

She attributes her reluctance to abortion’s controversial nature. “I was nervous, I think, to watch something so controversial. … I didn’t know how I’d react.”

. . .

While to her the first-term abortions “looked like an extended, more invasive version of a standard ob-gyn exam,” “there was a discomfort I hadn’t expected,” she says, “my emotional reaction to watching abortions.”

She describes several examples that made her react: a married couple in their mid-30s; a single mother with a 10-year-old daughter, who began to cry when they discussed abortion; and a 23-year-old who was 16 weeks pregnant.

Upon her return from Nebraska, Kliff was surprised by the reactions of her pro-abortion friends. “Friends who supported legal abortion bristled slightly when I told them where I’d been and what I’d watched,” she says. “Acquaintances at a party looked a bit regretful to have asked about my most recent assignment.”

Finally, she says, she continues to struggle with her reaction. “I had (and still have) difficulty understanding my own reaction,” she says, “both relieved to have watched a minimally invasive surgery and distressed by the emotionality of the process. Abortion involves weighty choices that, depending on how you view it, involve a life, or the potential for life.”

http://www.newsweek.com/id/212117?tid=relatedcl – remember: I (the blogger) don’t necessarily support the views in articles that I post! I believe it is helpful to learn how other people think, so there are times I post writings that help you do that.

Competing Emotions

When I watched an abortion for the first time, my reaction surprised me.

By Sarah Kliff, Newsweek Web Exclusive

Aug 15, 2009

 . . .

But there was a discomfort I hadn’t expected, my emotional reaction to watching abortions. It happened when I watched a married couple, in their mid-30s, the husband squeezing his wife’s hand, stroking her forehead. Another woman, a single mom with a 10-year-old daughter, started crying when we talked about abortion. “I think it’s OK,” she told me, “but it’s hard to see everyone doing it, there’s so many. I’m not mad at them at all. It’s just like, wow, there are so many people. There are seven or eight babies out there [in the waiting room].” There was the 23-year-old from Iowa who was 16 weeks along—she’d known about the pregnancy for two months but needed time to scrape together the money. By the time she arrived at Carhart’s, she was visibly showing under her striped pink tank top. To be sure, each and every patient had come to the conclusion, on their own, that this was where they needed to be. And I met a few patients who saw nothing complicated about that decision, who never second-guessed their choice. But they were not the majority. In Carhart’s clinic, most women were doing their best to balance competing emotions about their abortions, simultaneously sad and relieved, conflicted but confident. No one expected to spend a Sunday morning in Carhart’s clinic—but all were absolutely grateful to be there.

When I returned from Omaha, friends and colleagues wanted to know if I had “done it.” When I said I had, their reactions surprised me. Friends who supported legal abortion bristled slightly when I told them where I’d been and what I’d watched. Acquaintances at a party looked a bit regretful to have asked about my most recent assignment. The majority of Americans support Roe v. Wade’s protection of abortion, about 68 percent as of May. But my experience (among an admittedly small, largely pro-choice sample set) found a general discomfort when confronted with abortion as a physical reality, not a political idea. Americans may support abortion rights, but even 40 years after Roe, we don’t talk about it like other medical procedures.

And maybe that’s appropriate. Abortion may be a simple procedure medically, but it is not cancer surgery. It’s an elective procedure that no one—neither its defenders nor its detractors—expects to elect for themselves. I had (and still have) difficulty understanding my own reaction, both relieved to have watched a minimally invasive surgery and distressed by the emotionality of the process. Abortion involves weighty choices that, depending on how you view it, involve a life, or the potential for life. And my reaction, complicated and conflicted as it was, may have been a reflection of our national ambivalence about a private medical procedure at the center of a very public debate.

 

(The next link is also the source of the image shown at the right.)

 

http://www.lifenews.com/nat5381.html

Mayo Clinic Doctor Admits Abortions Hurt Women, Cause Premature Births

http://www.christianpost.com/article/20090821/rethinking-abortion-two-unexpected-witnesses/index.html

Rethinking Abortion: Two Unexpected Witnesses

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